Roads? Where we’re going, we don’t need roads

by Stephen Holroyd

In a world of grazeable, character-limited content, longform journalism has arguably never been more important. Snappy listicles, sharp infographics and eye-catching tweets all have their own, very important place of course, but offering a more considered, thought-provoking (and thought-leading) read – one that embraces the power of storytelling – should be considered as a part of any self-respecting content marketing mix.

Having first launched a longform, multimedia microsite for Gemalto back in Spring 2015 – then focusing on the impressive e-credentials of the tiny Balkan state of Estonia – our second project set out to explore the brave new world of connected cars and autonomous vehicles. Everything from the impact on car ownership and how we get around, to security, parking, payment and even the way cities are built has been put under the lens.

The automotive industry is changing – fast. After a century of slow progression, during which cars had barely evolved from the first Model T, advancements in technology and disruptive new players have shaken things up.

Through extended storytelling, eye-catching imagery and video, this automotive revolution is brought to life in striking digital form.

Projects of this nature don’t happen overnight of course, they have long gestation periods that are often fraught with ups and downs. But that’s precisely when tight project management, close client liaison, teamwork, quick thinking and creativity all come to the fore. Not to mention a passion for the task at hand.

All of these are traits in abundance at Wardour, and the sight of the Road to revolution: from connected cars to new mobility microsite finally emerging from the parking lot and hitting the streets last month is testament to the agility of all our departments: be it editorial, design and production, account management and our expert in-house video and coding teams.

The result is a microsite that draws on rich contributions from across the globe – including video shoots and interviews from as far afield as Gothenburg, Paris, Seattle and Cheltenham (guess who got the Cheltenham gig!)

Logistically, the project has been challenging. Editorially, it has involved myriad contributions, edits, re-edits and yet further edits, and from a design perspective it has tasked us to create an aesthetic and a user experience to equal the extended thinking involved with the subject matter itself.

But by taking the essence of one of the most ancient forms of content marketing – storytelling – we’ve been able to go back to the future.

Published Aug 09, 2017

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